http://www.narea.org/ssfm/roulette-bonus.html usa online fast payout casinos http://www.narea.org/ssfm/casino-deposit-methods.html instant flash casinos high stakes USA online casinos casino loyalty club best US casino casinos that accept us citizens http://www.narea.org/ssfm/online-slots-for-mac.html

Blogging cornerstones

There are a couple of complimentary pieces up by two Canadian blogging journalists, Mark Evans and Mathew Ingram, which, in their own ways talk about what I believe are the cornerstone ideas behind blogging… authenticity and feedback.

Mathew brings up a great point about idea marketer Seth Godin who is not leading by example in building relationships with his customer base. Seth has decided, by disabling comments on his blog, not to engage his community in conversation. The irony of this of course is that Seth is renowned for talking about engagement… If Seth has a site, he should be talking to his audience on a fairly regular basis. That’s part of the job of blogging. I need to be able to give direct feedback to the person who’s opinion I’m reading. It’s a conversation. This is a mistake corporate blogs can make as well, broadcasting vetted communiques out and expecting consumers to care…

Take away: leave the comments on and talk to those who would take the time to engage with you, otherwise it’s just a press release or a lecture.

It’s interesting that newspapers are starting to get this basic concept, which both Mathew and Mark can atest to:

We added comments on every story at the newspaper I work for, the Globe and Mail, because we would like to hear from readers — some of whom, it must be said, seem to like shouting or criticizing just for the sake of criticizing, but many of whom have intelligent and thoughtful things to say. The BBC has its “Have Your Say” feature for the same reason. In many ways, it’s the evolution of the letters section, or a more civilized version of call-in radio shows. We benefit from it, and so do our readers, and I would argue blogs do the same.

And from Mark:

At the end of the day, many journalists will have no choice but to blog if newspapers are going to survive and thrive. I think these blogs will be written differently than newspaper stories with a bit more personal colour. Blog are also going to be important tools to build a closer relationship with readers, which will means the “conversation” will go both ways rather than reporters broadcasting to readers.

I mentioned after the mesh conference that I was concerned about the impact of declining readership, declining ad revenue in print and online as consumers use news aggregators like Google News or RSS feeds. I wondered how newspapers could continue to pay the bills. Consumers being able to engage directly with the reporters can be a great way to provide a reason for the person to visit the site or blog of the paper… and ideally generate revenue. By being authentic and open for direct and honest feedback the newspaper has become part of the conversation. People will respect that and, hopefully, reward it monetarily over the long-term.

Technorati tags: , , , ,

Social Bookmarks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • del.icio.us
  • Reddit
  • NewsVine
  • Ma.gnolia
  • TailRank
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • SphereIt
  • Sphinn
  • StumbleUpon
  • TwitThis

“Can Web 2.0 Change the World?” – mesh panel day 1

As promised, although later than planned, a synopsis of the wonderful social responsibility panel at the mesh conference on Monday.

The panel, moderated by Tyler Hamilton of the Toronto Star, featured Tom Williams of givemeaning.com, Dave Pollard & George Irish of Amnesty. The topic, albeit a lofty one, was well covered in the lively discussion between the passionate and engaged group.

It was a thought provoking conversation that had social responsibility themes, but consistent truth about human nature and community interactions.

Click to continue reading ““Can Web 2.0 Change the World?” – mesh panel day 1″

Social Bookmarks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • del.icio.us
  • Reddit
  • NewsVine
  • Ma.gnolia
  • TailRank
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • SphereIt
  • Sphinn
  • StumbleUpon
  • TwitThis

mesh day 2 wrap up

mesh ‘06 is officially over and what a great time it was. The conference had it’s ups and downs, but it was by far the best I’ve been to in a long time. The relaxed format and discussions with the audience were perfect.

The final days focus on marketing was an interesting mix of ‘traditional’ and ‘rogue’, with a healthy dose of entreprenuers and old fashioned business sense thrown in. I have been a bit worried about the ‘bubblet’ aspects to 2.0, but it sounds like if we keep the channels of communication open and are willing to share ideas and missteps we can make an impact in the long run.

Click to continue reading “mesh day 2 wrap up”

Social Bookmarks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • del.icio.us
  • Reddit
  • NewsVine
  • Ma.gnolia
  • TailRank
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • SphereIt
  • Sphinn
  • StumbleUpon
  • TwitThis

meanwhile, at the CMA convention…

So while the ‘rogue’ marketers (hat tip to Tara Hunt) are meshing in Toronto, the big boys of marketing and advertising are doing the annual Canadian Marketing Association convention in Montreal.

And just what are they talking about? Well, being exceptional. Leveraging the influencers. Un-massing media.

Click to continue reading “meanwhile, at the CMA convention…”

Social Bookmarks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • del.icio.us
  • Reddit
  • NewsVine
  • Ma.gnolia
  • TailRank
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • SphereIt
  • Sphinn
  • StumbleUpon
  • TwitThis

mesh day 1: thoughts, impressions, and media

It was an interesting afternoon at the mesh conference. I regret I missed the opening two keynotes, as the focus on media (new vs. ‘traditional’) was a decidedly interesting one.

To start off the afternoon, I sat in on the “Are bloggers journalists?” panel with Om Malik, Michael Tippett, and Scott Karp, moderated by Mathew Ingram. Although the conversation focused mainly on political bloggers and “breaking news” a few key thought starters emerged…

Click to continue reading “mesh day 1: thoughts, impressions, and media”

Social Bookmarks: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages.
  • del.icio.us
  • Reddit
  • NewsVine
  • Ma.gnolia
  • TailRank
  • YahooMyWeb
  • Digg
  • Facebook
  • Google
  • SphereIt
  • Sphinn
  • StumbleUpon
  • TwitThis